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Celebrate 2020: Research Fair details

Everything you need to know about Celebrate the Library Week 2020 events...

Research Fair when and where

Bluffton University's sixth annual Research Fair will take place Thursday, February 6, from 1:00-4:30 pm on the library's main floor.  

This poster-session-style event will showcase the work of Bluffton University students; presentations exemplify student research in a broad sense, including traditional research presentations, projects, pre-professional experiences, and creative work.  Presenters are nominated by members of the Bluffton University faculty. Arts & Lecture credit is available for those who attend this event.

[Students! Are you presenting in this year's fair?  Check out our Success Guide!]

Participant List

Madison Ament

Carleigh Ankerman

Ermias Assefa

Aubrey Bartel *

Tim Bender *

Victoria Bowen

Wilmar Caal Botzoc

Sydney Cobb *

Liz Deal

Nathaniel DeWeese

Maddy Diemer

Jenny Dorsey *

Dani Easterday *

Seth Evans

Michael Fimiani

Stephanie Fox *

Jules Frazier

Berlin Fuqua

Takayla Gadberry *

Natilee Grover *

Marissa Hall

Olivia Hattery

Benjamin Heck *

Madison Heckman

Nathan Heinze *

John Hipp

Alana Holsapple *

April Horton *

Stacey Joseph

Skylar Kirk

Jacob Latkofsky

Justine Lesniewski

Eryn Litmer

Levi Litwiller

Cierra Long

Allison McClurg

Nathan McLouth

Hallie Mezerkor

TJ Mills

Claire Myree *

Abigail Newkirk

Ryan Oostland *

Taylor Ramey

Ally Richardson

Zoe Ryan

Caroline Schutz

Makenzie Speakman

Alexus Sponseller

Von A. Thomas

Taylor Waldeck

Hope Wischmeyer

Deborah Yoder

Ethan Zaerr


* indicates past Research Fair participation

Abstracts

Madison Ament

Senior, Speech Language Pathology and Audiology major with TESOL minor

Poverty and Learned Helplessness in Bilingual Education

The "Poverty and Learned Helplessness in Bilingual Education" research project examines the various social and psychological factors that come to play when an international student comes into US education system with little to no previous knowledge of English, more specifically factors relating to poverty. Using the knowledge of this critical issue in our country, this project also examines the various solutions that teachers can carry out so that there is a decline of learned helplessness in specifically our linguistically diverse students.

Nominated by Paul Neufeld Weaver / EDU 332: Social and Philosophical Issues in Education, Spring 2019


Carleigh Ankerman (presenting with TJ Mills and Taylor Ramey)

Junior, Psychology and Social Work double major

Chosen Methods of Communication Among Students and Faculty in the Digital Age

This project sought to find the preferred communication styles between students and professors on campus.  The researchers gave subjects everyday scenarios and asked subjects to choose their preferences between four communication methods (text, call, email, and video-chat).  Subjects were also asked to choose why that method was their preferred method (convenient, professional, leisure, and other).

Nominated by Deanna Barthlow-Potkanowicz / PSY 403: Psychology Research Seminar, Fall 2019


Ermias Assefa

Sophomore, Mathematics major with Computer Science minor

Sailing with Mathematics

Ermias says, "I would like to explain that every use and activity of humankind is mathematical.  I would like to explain relationships of math with business, Christianity, romance, crime," and other topics.

Nominated by Steve Harnish / MAT 135: Calculus (Spring 2019) and MAT 220: Discrete Mathematics (Fall 2019)


Aubrey Bartel *

Senior, Exercise Science and Pre-physical Therapy double major

Autism Now

Aubrey created an informational brochure about autism. She tied together research regarding causes, symptoms etc. of autism and her personal experience from having a sister with autism to create the brochure.

Nominated by Deanna Barthlow-Potkanowicz / PSY 235: Developmental Psychology, Fall 2019


Tim Bender *

Senior, History and Bible and Theology double major

A Parental Trap: Complaints and Parental Obligations in Numbers 11

While Numbers demonstrates a trope of framing stories of rebellion and complaint in order to position Moses as the perfect prophetic intercessor (see Numbers 11:1-3 and Numbers 12), Numbers 11:4-34 positions God as a flawed provider.  In light of literary and linguistic analysis, such flawed provisions emphasize God’s parental role in providing nourishment but indicate a gap in desires between God and God’s people.  God refused to enable too much craving for Egypt..

Nominated by Jackie Wyse-Rhodes / REL 312: Exegetical Studies: Numbers, Fall 2019


Victoria Bowen

Senior, Psychology major

The Importance of Studying Abroad for Undergraduates

Victoria explored the benefits of studying abroad as part of a student's undergraduate education.

Nominated by Paul Neufeld Weaver / EDU 332: Social and Philosophical Issues in Education, Fall 2019

 

Victoria Bowen (presenting with Alexus Sponseller and Stephanie Fox)

Senior, Psychology major

Highly Sensitive Persons Test Compared to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

This study analyzes the correlation between the Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator and the Highly Sensitive Persons Test. The research aims to determine whether there is a significant relationship between the two personality assessments.

Nominated by Deanna Barthlow-Potkanowicz / PSY 403: Psychology Research Seminar, Fall 2019


Wilmar Gonzalo Caal Botzoc

Senior, Social Work and Sociology double major

Northern Triangle (Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador) Immigration to the USA

The project was about the history behind the immigration crisis that makes Central Americans flee their home countries. The project explore the current situation that makes them try to reach the American Dream. The complicated individual history of each country that have something in common. Possible solution to the issue.

Nominated by Perry Bush / LAS 301: Issues in Modern America, Spring 2019


Sydney Cobb *

Junior, Chemistry and Physics double major with Biology minor

The Anti-Vax Movement

The modern anti-vaccination movement is presenting a public health crisis in that preventable diseases that were under control are now making comebacks.  To better understand where this issue came from, the roots of the movement and the actions being taken by the public sphere were studied.

Nominated by Perry Bush/ LAS 301: Issues in Modern America, Fall 2019


Liz Deal

Sophomore, Nutrition and Dietetics major

Nutrition for Maximum Health Benefits in a Workout

Liz sought to investigate the proper food to eat before and after physical activity that would maximize health benefits.

Nominated by Emily Buckell / BENV 100: Becoming a Scholar, Fall 2019


Nathaniel DeWeese

Sophomore, Math major with a minor in Honors Studies in the Liberal Arts

Alan Turing and the Halting Problem

Nathan explored the work of Alan Turing, who discovered it was impossible to write a program that can solve all problems.

Nominated by Steve Harnish / MAT 220: Discrete Mathematics, Fall 2019


Maddy Diemer

Sophomore, Social Work and Psychology double major

Intimate Partner Violence

Maddy says, "This project allowed me to use my previous experience and connect and make connection with the world around me regarding dating abuse and domestic violence. I learned that not everything is the same behind closed doors."

Nominated by Stephen Intagliata / BENV 100: Becoming a Scholar, Fall 2019


Jenny Dorsey *

Junior, Bible and Theology major with minors in Church and Communication and Sociology

Numbers 5:11-31: The Possibly Adulterous Wife

This paper is an in depth study of a passage in the book of Numbers that is often seen as modernly problematic.  Numbers 5:11-31 tells the story of what is to be done when a husband suspects his wife of cheating. This paper explains how this may have been a way for God to protect women in a patriarchal society while still addressing the problematic issues.

Nominated by Jackie Wyse-Rhodes / REL 312: Exegetical Studies: Numbers, Fall 2019

 

Curriculum: The Book of Philippians

Using feminist, historical and literary interpretation methods, students are asked to engage a book of the Bible in ways unusual for their age. Philippians is used to encourage students to become interpreters, to trust in their own abilities and to give them skills to interpret more effectively.

Nominated by Jackie Wyse-Rhodes / REL 322: Methods of Biblical Interpretation, Spring 2019


Dani Easterday *

Senior, Writing major with minors in English and Psychology

Delving in the Descent of Madness: Uncovering the Character Motivations of Poe and Gilman

Dani's project works to understand the character motivations of Edgar Allan Poe’s narrator in “The Tell-Tale Heart” and Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s narrator in “The Yellow Wallpaper.” In order to reach to this conclusion, she first looked at how the rhetoric and style that Poe and Gilman used contributed to the audience’s understanding of the narrator’s being mad. Finally, she looked at how Freud’s concept of the oedipal conflict could be applied to each character and their situation, examining how this conflict manifested and influenced both characters.

Nominated by Lamar Nisly / ENG 402: English Research Seminar, Fall 2019


Seth Evans

Junior, History and Sport Management double major

Economic Change in Kenton, Ohio

Seth explored the changes over time in the state of the economy for Kenton, Ohio.  He worked closely with the Hardin County Museum to gather and analyze relevant data for the project.  Seth noted that, "it was a painstaking task largely because no project such as this had been performed on Kenton."

Nominated by Perry Bush / HIS 252: Ohio and the Old Northwest, Spring 2019


Michael Fimiani (presenting with Jules Frazier)

Junior, Criminal Justice and Psychology double major with Sociology minor

Eyewitness Testimony in a College Classroom Setting

This research project was a study of memory retention in eyewitness testimony conducted in a college classroom setting. The research team was looking to see how many college students would remember the description of a stranger and see if their answers would be supportive in an eyewitness testimony.

Nominated by Deanna Barthlow-Potkanowicz / PSY 403: Psychology Research Seminar, Fall 2019


Stephanie Fox * (presenting with Victoria Bowen and Alexus Sponseller)

Junior, Criminal Justice and Psychology double major

Highly Sensitive Persons Test Compared to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

This study analyzes the correlation between the Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator and the Highly Sensitive Persons Test. The research aims to determine whether there is a significant relationship between the two personality assessments.

Nominated by Deanna Barthlow-Potkanowicz / PSY 403: Psychology Research Seminar, Fall 2019


Jules Frazier (presenting with Michael Fimiani)

Senior, Psychology and Social Work double major

Eyewitness Testimony in a College Classroom Setting

This research project was a study of memory retention in eyewitness testimony conducted in a college classroom setting. The research team was looking to see how many college students would remember the description of a stranger and see if their answers would be supportive in an eyewitness testimony.

Nominated by Deanna Barthlow-Potkanowicz / PSY 403: Psychology Research Seminar, Fall 2019


Berlin Fuqua

Junior, Art major with Writing minor

Metamorphosis

Berlin says, "this project is an conversation with myself and my audience in regards to my thoughts, feelings and experience of transitioning as a trans male. This project consisted as a body of work that used gesso/plaster sculpting, printmaking processes, painting, drawing and explored visual/emotional languages."

Nominated by Jim Fultz / ART 390: Independent Study, Fall 2019


Takayla Gadberry * (presenting with Alana Holsapple and Makenzie Speakman)

Senior, Psychology major with Education Studies minor

Handwritten and Electronic Note-Taking Information Retention Rates in College Students

This project was completed to find which form of note-taking would provide for stronger information retention. The study tested the theory that handwritten notes are more effective for information retention, while electronic notes provide more organized and detailed notes.

Nominated by Deanna Barthlow-Potkanowicz / PSY 403: Psychology Research Seminar, Fall 2019


Natilee Grover *

Junior, Bible and Theology and Child Development double major

The Advantages of Bilingual Education

Natilee explored the benefits of learning a second language at a young age.  She says, "Making a second language part of the curriculum at a younger age and staying consistent with this until high school will only create more success. "

Nominated by Perry Bush / LAS 301: Issues in Modern America, Fall 2019


Marissa Hall

First Year Student, Nursing major with English minor

How Faith Affects Happiness

Marissa investigated how an individual's faith affects his or her happiness levels.  She created a podcast to deliver her information in a creative way.

Nominated by Sarah Lehman / BENV 100: Becoming a Scholar, Fall 2019


Olivia Hattery

Sophomore, Art and Writing major with minor in Honors Studies in the Liberal Arts

The Tooncanny Valley Effect

Olivia's project discusses how the popular troupe of forcing realism into animation has a bad effect on the media. The project examines and argues against this by showing how it negatively affects the visual appearance, storytelling, and comes from a flawed viewpoint.

Nominated by Jackie Wyse-Rhodes / BENV 100: Becoming a Scholar, Fall 2019


Benjamin Heck *

Sophomore, Pre-medicine, Chemistry, and Physics triple major

Building a Radio

Ben says,  "For my semester project in Electronics and Instrumentation, I built a small AM radio transmitter and receiver using components available in the science center. This project was the culmination of concepts learned throughout the course, such as the properties and uses of transistors and operational amplifiers. I enjoyed learning how to build a radio, and I hope to show others how they can build a radio as well."

Nominated by Luke Myers / CEM 320: Electronics and Instrumentation, Fall 2019


Madison Heckman

Senior, English major

Through a Psychoanalytic Lens: The Juxtaposition of Gothic and Realistic Fiction

Madison analyzed a Gothic short story and a realistic drama in order to show how psychoanalytic aspects have infiltrated the realistic genre in a way that both mirrors the Gothic and serves the independent purposes of its own genre category. She looked specifically at Poe's "Ligeia" and Ibsen's A Doll's House (this title is supposed to be italicized). Madison concluded that genre categories are not as isolated as they appear to be, which may affect the ways that we teach and interpret literature in the future.

Nominated by Lamar Nisly / ENG 402: English Research Seminar, Fall 2019


Nathan Heinze *

Junior, Convergent Media major

History of Transgender Rights in America

Nathan created a poster giving a brief overview of the history of transgender rights in the United States as part of a semester-long course project.

Nominated by Perry Bush / LAS 301: Issues in Modern America, Fall 2019


John Hipp (presenting with Nathan McLouth)

Senior, Marketing major

SaferU

John and Nathan worked together to form an idea and plan for SaferU, which would allow individuals and their doctors to monitor multiple aspects of their health.  Their concept would integrate existing patch technology with an app that could interface with doctors' offices and insurance companies.

Nominated by Marathana Prothro / COM 242: Social Media, Fall 2019


Alana Holsapple * (presenting with Takayla Gadberry and Makenzie Speakman)

Junior, Psychology major with minors in Business Administration and Honors Studies in the Liberal Arts

Handwritten and Electronic Note-Taking Information Retention Rates in College Students

This project was completed to find which form of note-taking would provide for stronger information retention. The study tested the theory that handwritten notes are more effective for information retention, while electronic notes provide more organized and detailed notes.

Nominated by Deanna Barthlow-Potkanowicz / PSY 403: Psychology Research Seminar, Fall 2019


April Horton *

Senior, Physics major with minors in Computer Science and Mathematics

Summer REU Project: Galaxy Evolution and Environment at Redshift 1

April spent her summer at the Institute for Astronomy at The University of Hawai’i at Manoa studying galaxy evolution. Specifically, she was looking at the role dense environments at high redshifts play in galaxy evolution. April studied large-scale structures at redshifts close to 1, because currently there is an incomplete picture of how galaxy evolution occurs in these dense environments.

Nominated by Luke Myers / Summer REU at University of Hawai'i, Summer 2019


* indicates past Research Fair participation

Abstracts, cont'd

Skylar Kirk

First Year Student, Criminal Justice major

Becoming an FBI Agent

Skylar explored the process for becoming an FBI agent, including physical fitness testing and other requirements.

Nominated by Sarah Lehman / BENV 100: Becoming a Scholar, Fall 2019


Stacey Joseph

Nursing program

Factors Leading to Professional Nurses' Choice to Leave the Bedside

Stacey conducted an evidence-based practice project focusing on identifying why nurses with 10 years or more experience choose to leave the bedside. She conducted her study in an acute care hospital and collected her data via a survey which was voluntarily completed by nursing staff who met the required years of service. Implications for professional nursing practice were identified and possible solutions to the issue are explored.

Nominated by Sherri Winegardner / NRS 408: Current Trends and Issues in Nursing, Fall 2019


Jacob Latkofsky

Junior, Pre-physical Therapy major with psychology minor

Economic Change in Toledo, Ohio

Jacob's paper focused on how, during the industrial era, Toledo was a booming city due to the port of Toledo, the high amount of export, etc. However, during the 1970’s, Toledo hit an economic decline. Since then, Toledo has been making strides to improve their economy and become more of an attraction for those who are outside of the area.

Nominated by Perry Bush / HIS 252: Ohio and the Old Northwest, Spring 2019


Justine Lesniewski

First Year student, Criminal Justice and Psychology double major

Cyber-Bullying

Justine created a Twitter feed dedicated to sharing information on the causes and effects of cyber-bullying, as well as information on how to combat it.

Nominated by Kate Spike / BENV 100: Becoming a Scholar, Fall 2019


Eryn Litmer

Junior, Nutrition and Dietetics major

The Opioid Epidemic

Eryn says, "The opioid epidemic has made a huge impact on America in the last two decades. It is hard to explain what brought us here and how we can fix this issue. In my presentation, I explore a couple of reasons why we have this huge epidemic in our country. "

Nominated by Perry Bush / LAS 301: Issues in Modern America, Fall 2019


Levi Litwiller

Senior, Chemistry and Physics double major with Mathematics minor

Synthesis of Pyridazine Compounds Targeting M. Tuberculosis Polyketide Synthase 13

Tuberculosis is among the world's deadliest infectious diseases, and disproportionately affects the most economically disadvantaged people. With incidences of drug-resistant TB becoming more prevalent, the development of a new, effective treatment against tuberculosis is more than necessary. During his summer internship at AbbVie, Levi synthesized organic compounds which were tested as possible candidates for a new tuberculosis drug.

Nominated by Luke Myers / Summer internship at Abbvie, Inc. in Chicago, Summer 2019


Cierra Long

Sophomore, History major

The Importance of Social Activism

Cierra conducted a historical review of how social activism has lead to important social change and designed materials to encourage students to continue to be activists for change.

Nominated by Kate Spike / BENV 100: Becoming a Scholar, Fall 2019


Allison McClurg

Junior, Intervention Specialist and Elementary Education (PreK-5) double major

What is an Intervention Specialist?

Allison described her project by saying, "My project includes information about what an Intervention Specialist is, what they do, and why it is important to me. I also included how this topic relates to me and my personal experience so far. I also have a video of expert advice from our very own Tim Byers who agreed to do a one-on-one interview with me. "

Nominated by Heidi Mercer / BENV 100: Becoming a Scholar, Fall 2019


Nathan McLouth (presenting with John Hipp)

Senior, Economics major

SaferU

Nathan and John worked together to form an idea and plan for SaferU, which would allow individuals and their doctors to monitor multiple aspects of their health.  Their concept would integrate existing patch technology with an app that could interface with doctors' offices and insurance companies.

Nominated by Marathana Prothro / COM 242: Social Media, Fall 2019


Hallie Mezerkor

First Year Student, Criminal Justice major

The Other Side of the Opioid Crisis

Hallie created a video piece exploring how the steps the medical community has taken to reduce opioid addiction is hurting people with chronic pain who rely on opioids for pain management.

Nominated by Kate Spike / BENV 100: Becoming a Scholar, Fall 2019


TJ Mills (presenting with Carleigh Ankerman and Taylor Ramey)

Senior, Psychology major with Exercise Science minor

Chosen Methods of Communication Among Students and Faculty in the Digital Age

This project sought to find the preferred communication styles between students and professors on campus.  The researchers gave subjects everyday scenarios and asked subjects to choose their preferences between four communication methods (text, call, email, and video-chat).  Subjects were also asked to choose why that method was their preferred method (convenient, professional, leisure, and other).

Nominated by Deanna Barthlow-Potkanowicz / PSY 403: Psychology Research Seminar, Fall 2019


Claire Myree *

Junior, English and Communication double major

You Are What You Eat! Victorian Era Discourses in the Characterization of Charles Dickens' Great Expectations

Claire explored how the various instances of eating in the Dickens novel reveal aspects of class, characterization, and relationships.

Nominated by Lamar Nisly / ENG 402: English Research Seminar, Fall 2019


Abigail Newkirk

Senior, Speech Language Pathology and Audiology major with Special Education and Coaching minors

School Structure in an African Society: Education in Botswana

After traveling to Botswana for the Cross Cultural requirement at Bluffton, Abigail became intrigued by various aspects of the culture she experienced. Although wildlife, geographical location, government, and economy all collaborate to make Botswana prosper, Abigail decided to take a closer look at the educational systems. Specifically, she was interested in how those systems are designed, the strengths and weaknesses, and how she could assist in making their systems stronger for higher student success.

Nominated by Paul Neufeld Weaver / EDU 332: Social and Philosophical Issues in Education, Fall 2019


Ryan Oostland *

Senior, Mathematics major with Computer Science minor

Mathematical Morphology: Applying Dilation to Functions

Ryan first used mathematical morphology in a summer research internship for digital image processing. In Numerical Analysis, Ryan explored what happens when the basic morphological operation of dilation is applied to graphs of functions. His presentation will include an interactive program on mathematical morphology and function dilation.

Nominated by Darryl Nester / CPS 320: Numerical Analysis, Fall 2019


Taylor Ramey (presenting with Carleigh Ankerman and TJ Mills)

Junior, Psychology major with Sociology minor

Chosen Methods of Communication Among Students and Faculty in the Digital Age

This project sought to find the preferred communication styles between students and professors on campus.  The researchers gave subjects everyday scenarios and asked subjects to choose their preferences between four communication methods (text, call, email, and video-chat).  Subjects were also asked to choose why that method was their preferred method (convenient, professional, leisure, and other).

Nominated by Deanna Barthlow-Potkanowicz / PSY 403: Psychology Research Seminar, Fall 2019


Ally Richardson

First Year Student

On Season and Off Season Workouts for Female Athletes

Ally developed a paper version of an Instagram page related to how one would go about handling in season and out of season conditioning. 

Nominated by Crystal Sellers Battle / BENV 100: Becoming a Scholar, Fall 2019


Zoe Ryan

First Year Student, Nutrition and Dietetics major

The Reasons Behind Why We Dream

Zoe's project discusses many explanations from the past and present about how to interpret dreams and the benefits one can get from analyzing their dreams. Zoe will also present many ideas from Sigmund Freud’s Dream Theory which talks about the complicated process he went through to create a method to analyzing our dreams.

Nominated by Randy Keeler / BENV 100: Becoming a Scholar, Fall 2019


Caroline Schutz

Junior, TESOL major with Education Studies minor

Developing Literacy: Analyzing Phonics and Whole Language

Caroline's project explores the benefits and disadvantages of approaching reading, writing, and language acquisition through phonics and whole language. Although both simultaneously praised and criticized, educators everywhere have taken advantage of combining the opposing sides of the Reading Wars for a balanced approach to adapt learning to suit their styles of teaching & instill the best chance of academic growth and success for their students.

Nominated by Paul Neufeld Weaver / EDU 332: Social and Philosophical Issues in Education, Spring 2019


Makenzie Speakman

Junior, Early Childhood Education, Intervention Specialist, and Psychology triple major

Inclusion for Hearing-Impaired Students: Is it What is Best?

Having experienced the pros and cons of hearing impaired education within her early field experience, Makenzie explored the different options of education for hearing impaired students, as well as the benefits and disadvantages of each option.

Nominated by Paul Neufeld Weaver / EDU 332: Social and Philosophical Issues in Education, Fall 2019

 

Makenzie Speakman (presenting with Takayla Gadberry and Alana Holsapple)

Handwritten and Electronic Note-Taking Information Retention Rates in College Students

This project was completed to find which form of note-taking would provide for stronger information retention. The study tested the theory that handwritten notes are more effective for information retention, while electronic notes provide more organized and detailed notes.

Nominated by Deanna Barthlow-Potkanowicz / PSY 403: Psychology Research Seminar, Fall 2019


Alexus Sponseller (presenting with Victorial Bowen and Stephanie Fox)

Junior, Social Work major with Psychology minor

Highly Sensitive Persons Test Compared to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

This study analyzes the correlation between the Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator and the Highly Sensitive Persons Test. The research aims to determine whether there is a significant relationship between the two personality assessments.

Nominated by Deanna Barthlow-Potkanowicz / PSY 403: Psychology Research Seminar, Fall 2019


Von A. Thomas

Senior, History major with Special Education minor

The Story of the Assassination and the Assassin of James Garfield

Von examined the circumstances leading up to and the aftermath of the assassination of President James Garfield in the 19th century. Von wants to take you on a journey in the mind of the assassin of Garfield in the man known as Charles Guiteau to prove that the assassin is just as famous as the man that they killed. He explained the biography of Garfield, the assassination, the assassin, the trail, and the aftermath. He wants his viewers to think about one thing that makes a person want to kill a high force than them, the President of a political figure.

Nominated by Martina Cucchiara / HIS 400: History Research Seminar, Fall 2019


Taylor Waldeck

First Year Student, Criminal Justice and Psychology double major

Suicide Rates Among Varying Ages, Genders, and Sexual Preferences

Taylor examined the statistics of suicide within many different demographic groups and reflected on the experience of having a best friend suffer death by suicide in 2019.

Nominated by Sarah Lehman / BENV 100: Becoming a Scholar, Fall 2019


Hope Wischmeyer

First Year Student, Elementary Education and Intervention Specialist double major

United Way of Putnam County Program Bag

Hope investigated how the United Way of Putnam County can cater the needs of the children within the Ottawa Glandorf community. Based on her research, Hope discovered that United Way funds programs such as Stuff the Bus, Dolly Patton’s Imagination Library, and the Backpack Program or so-called KNAPSACK. As a future teacher, Hope believes it is very important to support children’s needs within the community.

Nominated by Amanda Beard / BENV 100: Becoming a Scholar, Fall 2019


Deborah Yoder

First Year Student, English major with a minor in Honors Studies in the Liberal Arts

Taxing Pink: The Game

Deborah says, "While researching the Pink Tax for my Becoming A Scholar class I decided to transfer my findings into a card game. I created a prototype four player game that educates about the topic of the Pink Tax through its gameplay and card design."

Nominated by Jackie Wyse-Rhodes/ BENV 100: Becoming a Scholar, Fall 2019


Ethan Zaerr

Senior, Physics and Chemistry double major with Education Studies minor

Sustainable Agriculture Major proposal

Bluffton University presents its seniors with the opportunity to design and implement a solution or innovation to enrich the quality of life for Bluffton’s students that stems from a global issue. With guidance from Dr. Alex Sider and working to meet the requirements of the Christian Values in a Global Community course, the students decided to design a sustainable agriculture degree. At the end of the research, students had analyzed possible grants within our scope, created a budget, determined resources required, created an education plan with new courses, and determined the benefits this major would have for not only Bluffton’s campus but also global benefits.

Nominated by Alex Sider/ LAS 400: Christian Values in a Global Community, Fall 2019


* indicates past Research Fair participation