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Celebrate 2018: Research Fair details

All the information you need regarding the library's annual celebration of student research and creativity.

Bluffton University's fourth annual Research Fair

Bluffton University's fourth annual Research Fair will take place Thursday, February 8, from 1:00-4:30 pm on the library's main floor.  This poster-session-style event will showcase the work of Bluffton University students; presentations exemplify student research in a broad sense, including traditional research presentations, projects, pre-professional experiences, and creative work.  Presenters are nominated by members of the Bluffton University faculty. Arts & Lecture credit is available for those who attend this event.

[Are you presenting in this year's fair?  Check out our Success Guide!]

Presenters

Determining Differences Between Old and New Ohio Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV) Populations

Katelyn Amstutz

Junior, Biology major

Nominated by: Angela Montel

Completed during: Summer REU, Ohio State University

During a summer research internship, Katelyn analyzed samples to determine the presence of the Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV) and how it has changed in Ohio chicken populations.

 

Fourth Ohio Cavalry: Ohio Regimental History Project

Ashley Backs

Senior, Early Childhood Education major, generalist endorsement

Nominated by: Perry Bush

Completed during: HIS 252: Ohio and the Old Northwest, Spring 2017

Ashley researched the 4th Ohio Cavalry, originally organized at Cincinnati, Lima, St. Maryes (now St. Mary's), and Camp Dennison, Ohio, from August to November 1861, to study this unit's involvement in the Civil War.

 

The Fulfillment of John 3:16 in John 4:1-42

Timothy Bender *

Sophomore, History and Bible and Theology majors

Nominated by: Jackie Wyse-Rhodes

Completed during: REL 252:  Introduction to New Testament, Spring 2017

John 4’s characterization of the Samaritan woman utilizes water, spirit, and boundary motifs to build on Jesus’ prior implicit revelations in John 2-3 and confirm Jesus’ divine identity as a universal Messiah.  In doing so, John 4:1-42 frames Jewish Messianic expectations in a Samaritan setting to open the door for the extension of salvation beyond the Jewish people.  An unexpected witness, who was culturally objectionable to a Jewish audience as a Samaritan outsider, was revealed to be already acting out Jesus' missional commands.

 

Gender Differences in Stroop Results

Abby Blake [Senior, Psychology major]

Shanon Gallagher * [Senior, Psychology and Sociology majors]

Shae Golden * [Senior, Psychology and Social Work majors]

Rebecca Starn [Senior, Psychology and Food and Nutrition with Wellness concentration majors]

Nominated by:  Deanna Barthlow-Potkanowicz

Completed during:  PSY 403: Research Seminar in Psychology, Fall 2017

The team's research goal was to administer the Stroop Test in three forms, gather results, and quantitatively study their meaning to determine if gender plays a role in speed and accuracy. The hypothesis was that women would be more successful when taking an alternatively colored Stroop Test and that men would be more successful when taking the traditionally colored Stroop Test. The study found that women were faster when taking both versions, but, unexpectedly, they also made more mistakes than men.

 

Living a Life Without Gluten

Amber Brown

First Year Student, Dietetics major

Nominated by:  Tyson Goings

Completed during:  LAS 105: Becoming A Scholar, Fall 2017

Amber's research focus is gluten, and her presentation defines gluten and how to live a life without it due to allergies.  Amber will discuss the kinds of gluten-free foods available from fast-food restaurants and how to modify a recipe to be gluten free.

 

Public Relations Experience at Lincolnview Local Schools

Claire Clay

Senior, Public Relations major

Nominated by:  Shari Ayers

Completed during:  Summer 2017 Discovery Grant Program

As a graduate of Lincolnview Local Schools, Claire wanted to give back to the community that shaped her into the person she is today while at the same time practicing and developing her public relations skills. While at the school, Claire wrote various news releases and articles that featured teachers and students at Lincolnview, as well as serving as a photographer and videographer. Claire also helped with planning banquets, assemblies, and the graduation ceremony.

 

The Dale Scale: Reclassifying Produce

Sydney Cobb

First Year Student, Chemistry, Physics, and Pre-Medicine majors

Nominated by:  Marathana Prothro

Completed during:  LAS 105: Becoming A Scholar, Fall 2017

Sydney researched the use of fructose in distinguishing fruits and vegetables and created a blog to present her research and findings.

 

Eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry: Ohio Regimental History Project

Allison Crall

Junior, Intervention Specialist and Early Childhood Education majors

Nominated by:  Perry Bush

Completed during:  HIS 252: Ohio and the Old Northwest, Spring 2017

Allison researched the Eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, which fought in many campaigns of the Army of the Potomac and in engagements like Winchester, Antietam, Gettysburg, Fredericksburg, and many more, mostly serving as skirmishers.  Allison's project detailed the hardships that the Eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry and many others faced during the Civil War.

 

Patterns and Properties of Pascal's Triangle

Maelinn Delong *

Junior, Mathematics and Education majors

Nominated by:  Steve Harnish

Completed during:  MAT 390: Independent Study: Computational Explorations in Number Theory: Case studies from Pascal, Fall 2017

Maelinn sought to find more patterns and ways to generate Pascal's Triangle for a high school classroom audience.  She found several different ways to generate Pascal's Triangle using squares, cubes, and other shapes, and she discovered patterns while generating the triangle itself.

 

Women in Ministry: A Nine Day Devotional

Jennifer Dorsey

First Year Student, Bible and Theology major

Nominated by: Melissa Friesen

Completed during:  LAS 105: Becoming A Scholar, Fall 2017

Jennifer created a nine-day devotional focusing on the controversial topic of women in ministry. She focused on different viewpoints and biblical stories about women and how that affects, affirms, and explains her belief that women are equal to men when it comes to leadership ability in the church. 

 

Teen Suicide

Amryn Dover

First Year Student, Early Childhood Education and Intervention Specialist majors

Nominated by: Tyson Goings

Completed during: LAS 105: Becoming A Scholar, Fall 2017

Amryn explored the issue of teen suicide by examining the leading causes, risk factors, and motivations.  Her goal was to raise awareness among students of the seriousness of the issue.

 

Ceramics and Drawing Portfolio

Brista Drake * 

Junior, Art and Writing major

Nominated by: Phil Sugden

Completed during: ART 217: Ceramics I, Fall 2017 and other works

Brista has curated a set of example works from Ceramics I, complemented by two drawings from her art studies portfolio.

 

Childhood Memories and their History

Danielle Easterday

First Year Student, Writing major

Nominated by:  Jeff Gundy

Completed during:  HON 110: Honors Seminar in Composition & Literature, Fall 2017

Danielle researched the history of the LGBTQ+ community, in the hopes that doing so would allow her to understand certain childhood memories that include her two aunts. She also examined current concerns of the LGTBQ+ community regarding the state of the White House, especially the President, and she explored a child's psychology when they are raised by lesbian or gay parents.

 

Graphic Design work for Bridge: The Bluffton University Literary Journal

Cara Echols *

Junior, Art and Writing major, Graphic Design minor

Nominated by:  Jamie Lyn Fletcher

Completed during:  ENG 113: Bridge: The Bluffton Literary Journal Staff; ENG 207: Professional and Technical Writing, Fall 2017

Cara will present a collection of graphic design posters, brochures and pamphlets that were commissioned by Bridge: The Bluffton University Literary Journal and the English Department.

 

Transcendence, Oppression and Stubbornness: Atwood and Dickinson on Divine Love

Cara Echols *

Junior, Art and Writing major, Graphic Design minor

Nominated by:  Jeff Gundy

Completed during:  ENG 243: Studies in American Literature: The Lost America of Love, Fall 2017

Cara conducted a literary analysis focusing on the works of authors Margaret Atwood and Emily Dickinson in relation to their perceptions surrounding divine love.

 

Gatsby and Marxism

Amber Edwards *

Senior, English Adolescent Young Adult Education major

Nominated by:  Jeff Gundy

Completed during:  ENG 243: Studies in American Literature: The Lost America of Love, Fall 2017

Amber's essay explores F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel The Great Gatsby and its connection with Marxist criticism. One of the central themes of this novel is money and how money impacts individuals and relationships. A Marxist analysis of this text can explain Gatsby's economic motivation, the commodification of Daisy, and the love triangle between Tom, Daisy, and Gatsby as being a kind of labor triangle.

 

The Mother Within: An Analysis of the Mother in Frankenstein

Amber Edwards *

Senior, English Adolescent Young Adult Education major

Nominated by:  Lamar Nisly

Completed during:  ENG 402: English Research Seminar, Fall 2017

Amber explored the role of the mother figure in Mary Shelley's novel, Frankenstein. She provides an analysis of Victor as a mother figure to the creature, Victor's loss of his mother, Victor's desire to be a natural mother, and the role of Elizabeth. Literary theory is used to explain these aspects of the novel.

 

Assisted Suicide

Emma Eickholt

Senior, Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology majors

Nominated by:  Deanna Barthlow-Potkanowicz

Completed during:  PSY 235: Developmental Psychology, Fall 2017

Emma created an educational presentation on the arguments for and against assisted suicide. The presentation defines assisted suicide and articulates the laws surrounding it, physicians views, and a few current stories tied to the subject. The goal of the project was to understand assisted suicide and the perspective from both sides of the argument.

 

Inclusion for Elementary Students with Reading Disabilities

Morganne Faler

Junior, Early Childhood Education and Intervention Specialist majors

Nominated by:  Paul Neufeld Weaver

Completed during:  EDU 332: Social and Philosophical Issues in Education, Fall 2017

Morganne studied the problem of the large amount of students with reading disabilities and examined if inclusion was the best practice to help elementary students with reading disabilities. Does inclusion benefit students with reading disabilities and students in the regular education classroom?  As part of her findings, Morganne included practical ways to create an inclusive classroom.

 

Case file of a Vigilante

Stephanie Fox

First Year Student, Psychology and Criminal Justice majors

Nominated by:  Melissa Friesen

Completed during:  LAS 105: Becoming a Scholar, Fall 2017

Stephanie created a fictional vigilante in order to research what real factors caused someone to become a vigilante.  She developed a “hero” based on those factors, and in doing so, created a fictional city with a map, a historical narrative, and a set of fictional statistics.

 

Sul Sul

Stephanie Fox

First Year Student, Psychology and Criminal Justice majors

Nominated by:  Jeff Gundy

Completed during: HON 110: Honors Seminar in Composition & Literature, Fall 2017

Sul Sul is a research paper discussing videos games, more specifically simulators, on a developing prefrontal cortex. It evolved from a previous essay that was written in the style of Robert Pirsig’s “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance” - a style Stephanie says has features of a research paper and of a story.

 

Global Differences in Birthing Practices

Stephanie Fox [First Year Student, Psychology and Criminal Justice majors]

Justina Fuqua [Senior, Social Work major]

Nominated by:  Deanna Barthlow-Potkanowicz

Completed during:  PSY 235: Developmental Psychology, Fall 2017

Justina and Stephanie examined different birthing practices found around the world. They studied practices in Germany, Mexico, Nigeria, Japan, Iraq, Thailand, and originally presented their findings in a pamphlet.  They also created a 3D globe with flags marking each of the countries they studied.

 

57th Ohio Volunteer Infantry: Ohio Regimental History Project

Dakota Fredette *

Junior, Convergent Media major

Nominated by:  Perry Bush

Completed during:  HIS 252: Ohio and the Old Northwest, Spring 2017

Dakota researched the 57th Ohio Volunteer Infantry regiment, which was  formed in Findlay, Ohio, (Dakota's hometown) but drew men from the surrounding communities and was a part of General Grant's Army of the Tennessee.  Dakota researched the regiment's men (including two Medal of Honor recipients), commanders, and the long and major campaigns in which they took part, including Shiloh, Vicksburg, and Chattanooga.

 

LGBT Bullying and its Effects on Students

Stacey Freed *

Senior, History Education major

Nominated by:  Paul Neufeld Weaver

Completed during:  EDU 332: Social and Philosophical Issues in Education, Fall 2017

Stacey researched bullying and its effect on Amerca's youth, particularly those part of the LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender) population. For this project, Stacey interviewed Jamie Nabozny, a Student, who experienced bullying in Ashland, Wisconsin.  Stacey presents solutions to the bullying problem, including zero-tolerance policies and restorative justice.

 

Tennessee Reconnect Act

Luke Gerardot

First Year Student, Early Childhood Education and Intervention Specialist majors

Nominated by:  Tyson Goings

Completed during:  LAS 105: Becoming A Scholar, Fall 2017

Luke reviews a program created by the state of Tennessee to increase the number of college attendees and graduates in the state. 

 

Observing the Bystander Effect Among College Students

Taylor Good [Junior, Social Work and Psychology majors]

Allison Hammond [Senior, Psychology major]

Emily Tabler [Senior, Social Work and Psychology majors]

Liandrin Thomas [Junior, Psychology major]

Nominated by:  Deanna Barthlow-Potkanowicz

Completed during:  PSY 403: Research Seminar in Psychology, Fall 2017

The purpose of this study was to observe the bystander effect among college level students. In the study the researchers observed the behavior of the participants’ reactions to a woman tripping and dropping materials. What we looked for in the bystander study was if the participants physically got up to help, acted like they wanted to help but did not get up, and if they made no gesture to help. Participants took part in a survey that provided us with demographic information.

 

The Effect of Music on Memory

Destiny Grant [Junior, Psychology major]

Nick Bondra [Senior, Psychology major]

Jonah Eckert [Junior, Psychology major]

Jordan Watkins [Senior, Psychology major]

Nominated by:  Deanna Barthlow-Potkanowicz

Completed during:  PSY 403: Research Seminar in Psychology, Fall 2017

This research group tested music on working memory on undergraduate students from all majors and all years. Participants were given 3 minutes to study a list of 20 words for three minutes in a test-retest experiment (once with music of participants choice and once without music). Results showed there was no significant difference between listening to music and recalling a word bank vs not listening to music and recalling a word bank.

 

The Man Behind Superman

Natilee Grover

First Year Student, Psychology and Bible and Theology majors

Nominated by:  Randy Keeler

Completed during:  LAS 105: Becoming A Scholar, Fall 2017

Natilee explores how Superman was created and the journey two men had to take to make this diverse character come to life.  Natilee's presentation includes the different superhero outfits that were designed for the character.

 

Logic of Digital Circuitry

Amy Hall

Junior, Physics major

Nominated by: Steve Harnish

Completed during:  MAT 220: Discrete Mathematics, Fall 2017

Amy used topics from discrete math - truth tables and logic gates - to design digital circuits.

 

The Effect of Physical Activity on Stress

Madison Heckman

First Year Student, English Education major

Nominated by: Randy Keeler

Completed during:  LAS 105: Becoming A Scholar, Fall 2017

Madison pursued this project to find out whether physical activity can reduce one's stress.  Madison found that physical activity does indeed reduce stress and is a great way to maintain healthy stress levels.  She also learned how stress works in correlation with the endocrine system.  She presents her findings in a short film.

--

* denotes participant in past Research Fairs or Five Minutes of Fame events

 

Presenters

From Cards to Cardboard: The History of Nintendo

Nathan Heinze

First Year Student, undecided

Nominated by:  Randy Keeler

Completed during:  LAS 105: Becoming A Scholar, Fall 2017

Nathan created a short film on the history of Nintendo, from the company’s formation in 1889 to their current ventures in 2017. The video utilizes images, narration, and footage from or relating to their games, their key employees, and even failed business ventures, and how they never changed their goal entirely, staying true to themselves.

 

Sonification and Visualization of Scientific Data

April Horton

Sophomore, Physics major

Nominated by:  Steve Harnish

Completed during:  CPS 299: Introduction to High Performance Computing for Scientific Research, Fall 2017

April studied data, previously collected through LAMMPS, of Lennard-Jones solids, and she used Mathematica to perform Fourier analysis on 256 x-coordinates of the one particle’s movement in the solid. The second part of her project consisted of performing Fourier analysis on MP3 files by utilizing Mathematica’s spectrogram and periodogram commands.

 

Programming at Tempus Technologies

Micah Hunsberger *

Senior, Mathematics and Information Technology majors with Computer Science minor

Nominated by:  Steve Harnish

Completed during: Summer Internship, Summer 2017

Micah's poster will display various development and scripting projects and tools used from three summers of experience as an intern at Tempus Technologies. It includes notes from developing a cloud-based, machine-to-machine connectivity service, automating the installation of a development environment, and scripting the deployment of web based production applications.

 

Summer Educational Program in Neuropsychiatric Functional Neuroimaging

Kala Jilani-Pritchett

Senior, Psychology major

Nominated by: Shari Ayers

Completed during:  Summer 2017 Discovery Grant Program

Kala will share her experience in a program designed to introduce students at all levels to functional neuroimaging methods and how they can be applied to study of the systems levels of neuropathophysiology underlying different neuropsychiatric disorders. 

 

The Lukewarm Coffee of Revelation 3:14-22 and the Bystander Effect

Janelle Johnson *

Senior, Psychology and Bible and Theology majors

Nominated by:  Jackie Wyse-Rhodes

Completed during:  REL 312: Exegetical Studies: The Book of Revelation, Fall 2017

Janelle explored the apathetic behavior and self-sufficiency of the first century Laodicean church in Revelation 3:14-22. She utilized the modern concept of the Bystander Effect to illustrate possible reasons behind the spiritual condition of the church of Laodicea.

 

Exploration of the Field of Dentistry

Justin Kauffman

Sophomore, Biology major

Nominated by:  Shari Ayers

Completed during: Summer 2017 Discovery Grant Program

Justin received a Summer 2017 Discovery Grant to pursue a job shadowing assistantship at the Viola Startzman Clinic in Wooster, Ohio. While shadowing the Dentists at the clinic, Justin earned an understanding of general dentistry concepts.  His work included assisting dentists by handing them specific tools and taking appointment notes, as well as sterilizing the rooms before the next patient arrived.

 

Painting and Ceramics Portfolio

Chase King

Senior, Art major

Nominated by: Phil Sugden

Completed during: ART 213: Painting (Spring 2017) and ART 217: Ceramics (Fall 2017)

Chase has curated a porfolio of works from ART 213 and ART 217 coursework, including:

  • Sigourney, a painting to practice acrylic paints, based on favorite actor
  • Waterside, a painting of a flowing river used to practice different acrylic painting techniques.
  • Crawling Back, an activist piece focused on how queer people face ridicule after revealing their true selves, leading them to wish they never "came out"
  • DouBowl, a ceramics piece consisting of two bowls made to be stacked on top of each other

 

The Importance of Facial Expression in Choral Singing

Kasandera Knief *

Junior, Music Education major

Nominated by: Natalie Mallis

Completed during: MUS 352: Music Teaching Methods: Choral and General Music, Fall 2017

The choral performance does not only include the use of proper tone and intonation, but also the use of facial expressions. The exercises used in the classroom should be applied to the concert setting in a choir classroom. Several studies have supported the fact that the overall performance of an ensemble is improved when singing with the correct facial expressions to match the mood of the song.

 

Creativity and Right vs. Left Brain Teaching

Elizabeth Luersman *

Junior, Art Education major

Nominated by:  Paul Neufeld Weaver

Completed during:  EDU 332: Social and Philosophical Issues in Education, Fall 2017

Elizabeth researched the differences in the right and left hemispheres of the brain, examining the roles of both hemispheres, particularly with respect to learning.  She discussed how teachers can use creativity in their classrooms and the benefits to teaching creativity and creatively.

 

Artwork Portfolio

Elizabeth Luersman *

Junior, Art Education major

Nominated by:  Phil Sugden

Completed during:  ART 213: Painting; ART 217: Ceramics I; independent study; Spring, Summer, and Fall 2017

Elizabeth has curated a portfolio of examples from studies in drawing, painting, and ceramics over the past year.

 

To Live a Dream

Claire Myree

First Year Student, English major

Nominated by: Marathana Prothro

Completed during: LAS 105: Becoming A Scholar, Fall 2017

Claire developed a screenplay that explores how African-American actors are type-casted in the media, and what these type-cast roles are.

 

Self-Love and the Art of Black Hair Care

Claire Myree

First Year Student, English major

Nominated by: Jeff Gundy

Completed during: HON 110: Honors Seminar in Composition & Literature

Claire's essay describes how self-love and acceptance tie directly in with hair care, as told from the perspective of a black girl.

 

The Summer I Became a Duck Mom

Sarah Oliver *

Junior, Biology major with Chemistry minor

Nominated by: Shari Ayers

Completed during:  Summer 2017 Discovery Grant Program

Sarah designed her own summer long independent research project at Bluffton University in which she examined the experiments conducted on chickens using egg-less shell cultures and attempted to replicate them using duck embryos. While ultimately unsuccessful, it proved to be an excellent exercise in experimental design, a test of Sarah's current lab skills and gave moderate insight to academic research.

 

Are Helmets Really Effective?

Isaac Paine

First Year Student, History Adolescent/Young Adult Education major

Nominated by: Jeff Gundy

Completed during:  HON 110: Honors Seminar in Composition & Literature, Fall 2017

Isaac studied the concussion issue in American football in an effort to explore a real solution to the problem. Examining the NFL's attempts to improve equipment technology, learning how the game of rugby goes about injury prevention, and understanding the nature of the game of football help lead to a simple, yet effective solution: the use of proper techniques and having enough self-awareness to know that one is not invincible. In short, Isaac says, use your head, not your helmet.

 

Rural Homelessness: Bluffton and Beyond

Abbie Parkins

First Year Student, Accounting and Business Administration majors

Nominated by: Jamie Lyn Fletcher

Completed during: ENG 110: College English, Fall 2017

A lifelong resident of Bluffton, Abby thought it would be interesting to discuss potential homelessness in a small town like Bluffton. "I have always heard that others believe there is a comfortable, warm, and welcoming feeling, so the idea of homelessness rarely comes to mind. However, people experience the same difficulties associated with homelessness and housing distress in America's small towns and rural areas as they do in urban areas, [but] it is just not as easy to spot."  Abby's project includes an interview with a village police officer and presents statistics and possible solutions. 

 

Where Do Myths Come From?

Ginesha Robinson

First Year Student, Pre-Medicine and Biology majors

Nominated by:  Jackie Wyse-Rhodes

Completed during:  LAS 105: Becoming A Scholar, Fall 2017

Ginesha created an encyclopedia excerpt describing myths and legends from around the world. She created a few myths of her own, and they have their own category within the encyclopedia.

 

No Good Nuptials and Woebegone Weddings: Disastrous Marriages in Thomas Hardy's Novels

Emily Rush *

Junior, Adolescent/Young Adult Language Arts Education major

Nominated by: Lamar Nisly

Completed during: ENG 402: English Research Seminar, Fall 2017

Through a psychoanalytic and feminist lens, this research essay analyzes the relationships of three couples from three Hardy Novels: Far From the Madding Crowd, The Return of the Native, and Tess of the D'Urbervilles. Each novel's couple breaks apart for various societal and individual reasons, revealing the ideals of the society as well as the human thoughts and feelings of characters.

 

Inequality in Pennsylvania State School Funding

Emily Rush *

Junior, Adolescent/Young Adult Language Arts Education major

Nominated by: Paul Neufeld Weaver

Completed during: EDU 332: Social and Philosophical Issues in Education, Fall 2017

Pennsylvania has some of the highest levels of funding inequality in its public schools. This research paper discusses this inequality, finding the root of its cause, breaking down the legislation and statistics, and searching for ways to improve. 

 

Crafting the Future: Delving Into the World of 3D Printers

Michael Short

First Year Student, Information Technology major

Nominated by:  Jackie Wyse-Rhodes

Completed during:  LAS 105: Becoming A Scholar, Fall 2017

Michael compared manufactured 3D printers to self made 3d printers. Using personal experience, professional opinions, and published sources, Michael was able to determine that the knowledge gained building a 3D printer far outweighs the benefits of a manufactured printer.

 

Effects of Maltreatment on Children in School

Makayla Smith

Junior, Early Childhood Education major

Nominated by:  Paul Neufeld Weaver

Completed during:  EDU 332: Social and Philosophical Issues in Education, Fall 2017

Makayla studied effects of maltreatment on academic achievement and how teachers can help. Research shows that children who have experienced maltreatment have lower academic achievement because maltreatment affects cognitive development and functioning, neural development, attention span, information processing, and behavior.   When teachers and school systems do more to help students who are victims of maltreatment, the students will be able to achieve more.

 

Simulating MELI – Median Expected Lifetime Income

Sam Sturm *

Senior, Economics major

Nominated by:  Steve Harnish

Completed during:  CPS 299: Introduction to High Performance Computing for Scientific Research, Fall 2017

GDP has been the standard for well-being statistics for decades, but Sam contends that we can do so much better. Based on the work done by Jonathan Andreas, Sam developed the basis for creating a simulation of US MELI, based on household incomes and life expectancies. Sam will outline possibilities for expanding MELI to include variations in life expectancy as wealth increases and as groups engage in lifespan-changing activities such as smoking.

 

Aussie: The Land Down Under

Michelle Swartley

First Year Student, Accounting and Economics majors with Business Administration minor

Nominated by:  Jackie Wyse-Rhodes

Completed during:  LAS 105: Becoming A Scholar, Fall 2017

Michelle created a magazine that includes multiple articles discussing different elements of the country Australia. It includes travel information, quick tips, and information that people may need to know before going there. The 20-page magazine was developed with the goal of helping readers to get a better understanding of the country before deciding to travel or move there.

 

Love. Simplicity. Peace.

Michelle Swartley

First Year Student, Accounting and Economics majors with Business Administration minor

Nominated by:  Jeff Gundy

Completed during:  HON 110: Honors Seminar in Composition & Literature, Fall 2017

Michelle's personal essay reflecting on different parts of the Mennonite faith in which she grew up.  Her personal experiences led to more in-depth research about certain familial traditions in comparison to the Mennonite faith.

 

International Adoption

Chelsey Taylor

First Year Student, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology major

Nominated by:  Randy Keeler

Completed during:  LAS 105: Becoming A Scholar, Fall 2017

Chelsey's project explores the benefits and requirements of internationally adopting a child.  Chelsey asserts that while the process may be lengthly, the benefits of this process are certainly worth the wait. There are multiple reasons for adoption, which include preserving the family line, offering children to childless couples, and supporting children who have been orphaned. With help from individuals and couples all over the country, millions of children are being taken out of orphanages and foster care and placed into a stable home where they belong.

 

Size Doesn't Matter

Hannah Wagner

First Year Student, Biology major, pre-veterinary concentration

Nominated by:  Jeff Gundy

Completed during: HON 110: Honors Seminar in Composition & Literature, Fall 2017

For this project, Hannah dissected the age-old cliche of "size doesn't matter" with a focus on athletics. Each sport has specific expectations for an athlete's build and abilities. This project delves deeper into the concept that although possessing the ideal stature is advantageous, size is not required for an athlete to be successful.

 

Companion Animals

Hannah Wagner

First Year Student, Biology major, pre-veterinary concentration

Nominated by:  Matthew Friesen

Completed during:  LAS 105: Becoming A Scholar, Fall 2017

Hannah examined the health benefits of having a companion animal. Service animals, therapy animals, and emotional-support animals play a major role in our lives, and interactions with these creatures improves the quality of life for both parties. Hannah discusses the duties and hardships of fostering and training a service dog as a volunteer for the organization 4 Paws for Ability.

 

Identifying Novel Chemical Compounds to Inhibit the Development of Cancer

Dean Walters

Senior, Biology and Pre-Medicine majors

Nominated by:  Angela Montel

Completed during:  Summer 2017 REU

During a 13 week experience at NIH-NCATS, Dean completed research involving a cellular process that is commonly seen to initiate the development of cancer. Dean's research focus was colon cancer cells and testing large chemical libraries to identify new compounds that would inhibit a specific cellular process. The positive hits were then reevaluated and sent forward to collaborators for further testing. 

 

57th Ohio Volunteer Infantry: Ohio Regimental History Project

Meredith Wood

Junior, Middle Childhood Education (Math and Science) major

Nominated by:  Perry Bush

Completed during:  HIS 252: Ohio and the Old Northwest, Spring 2017

For this project, Meredith followed the tracks of the 57th Ohio Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War. Her research included the formation of the regiment, the battles in which they fought, as well as Lieutenant Colonel William Mungen.  She also explored the fatalities of the regiment from both disease and battle.

 

Bullying in Middle School

Meredith Wood

Junior, Middle Childhood Education (Math and Science) major

Nominated by:  Paul Neufeld Weaver

Completed during:  EDU 332: Social and Philosophical Issues in Education, Fall 2017

Meredith studied the effects bullying has on middle school students as well as how participating in the bullying dynamic affects future success.  She examined bullying trends, what makes bullying so prevalent during middle school, and the role peer pressure and social exclusion play in the dynamic.  Meredith looked into bullying misconceptions, prevention programs, and what educators can do to help prevent bullying.

 

Drug Discovery Research

Chelsea Zoltowski

Senior, Chemistry major

Nominated by:  Angela Montel

Completed during:  Summer REU, Chicago, Summer 2017

Chelsea spent the summer of 2017 researching drug discovery for tuberculosis synthesizing small molecules for treatments towards this disease. She will present on her experiences and on the context of research in an industry setting.

 

* denotes participant in past Research Fairs or Five Minutes of Fame events